4 papersI was asked about a few recent papers about some studies I did into what the solution-focused approach is and what it yield. Here are those papers:

 

  1. The Solution-Focused Mindset: An Empirical Test of Solution-Focused Assumptions
  2. What Solution-Focused Coaches Do: An Empirical Test of an Operationalization of Solution-Focused Coach Behaviors
  3. Testing the Association Between Solution-Focused Coaching and Client Perceived Coaching Outcomes
  4. How the Solution-Focusedness of Coaches Is Related To Their Thriving at Work

These papers, I think, are closely related to each other. Paper 1 describes a study through which I established an indirect way to measure solution-focused assumptions. I did this by showing a relationship between how long people worked solution-focused and how intensely they used it on the one hand and the degree to which they agreed with assumptions. Paper 2 describes a different study through which I established an indirect way to measure solution-focused coach behaviors.

 

The results of study 1 and 2 enabled me to measure respondents’ solution-focusedness without directly asking them how solution-focused they thought they were. I build on this in study 3 and 4. In study 3 and 4 I did not mention the word ‘solution-focused’ at all nor did I refer to well-known techniques such as the miracle question or the scaling question.

 

In study 3 I  asked respondents (clients) to say how their coach had acted. This gave me an indirect measure of their coaches’ solution-focusedness. This study showed that the coaches had acted in ways which were in accordance with the solution-focused approach, the better the clients had found the outcomes of the coaching.

 

Study 4 asked coaches how much they agreed with the solution-focused assumptions and to which extent they acted in accordance with solution-focused coach behaviors (again without any references to the solution-focused approach, that is). This study showed that the more the coaches answered in accordance with the solution-focused assumptions and behaviors the more they thrived at work.

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